LA as Subject

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How ‘Golden Apples’—Oranges, That Is—Sold the Golden State

Posted by Nathan Masters on Mar 21, 2014

Courtesy of the David Boule Collection

Call it an early version of viral marketing. Promoters of two products -- a fruit and the region that grew it -- created hundreds of images of oranges, orange trees, and orange groves during the reign of Southern California's Orange Empire. They then leveraged the social network of the time --… Read more »

Topics: KCET

Photos: When L.A.‘s Most Popular Streets Were Dirt Roads

Posted by Nathan Masters on Oct 17, 2013

Like some of the very people who drive on them, a few Los Angeles streets have achieved the height of fame. Sunset Boulevard lent its evocative name to Billy Wilder's classic film noir. Pasadena's Colorado Boulevard appears on millions of television screens each New Year's Day as the route of the… Read more »

Topics: KCET

Hooray for…Colegrove? Remembering Hollywood’s Forgotten Neighbor

Posted by Nathan Masters on Oct 1, 2013

Glance at an old map of the Hollywood area like the one above and two things stand out. First,the land is remarkably empty. There are few roads and even fewer structures. Second, two separate towns appear where we would expect one: Hollywood, destined for stardom, and Colegrove, destined for… Read more »

Topics: KCET

Incline L.A.: Catalina’s Island Mountain Railway (Episode 3)

Posted by Nathan Masters on Aug 22, 2013

The year was 1892, and Catalina Island was in foreclosure.

Its owner, George Shatto, had envisioned a resort town on the island but had built few tourist amenities apart from the three-story Hotel Metropole. When the island finally slipped from Shatto's hands, its new owners purchased it for… Read more »

Topics: KCET

Incline L.A.: The Lost Residential Railway of Mt. Washington (Episode Two)

Posted by Nathan Masters on Jul 11, 2013

Mount Washington: a hill more than a mountain, the landform in northeast Los Angeles is home today to leafy streets and artists' bungalows. But just a century ago, Mount Washington remained carpeted in chaparral, its hilltop land inaccessible to real estate developers and homebuyers. Ultimately,… Read more »

Topics: KCET

From Worthless Land to Semi-Wild Paradise: The Origins of Elysian Park

Posted by Nathan Masters on Jun 27, 2013

Like many of the city's earliest recreational tracts, Los Angeles carved Elysian Park out of municipal lands that defied development. A Jewish cemetery and a rock-quarrying enterprise were among the few early, documented uses of the land, but the area's deep ravines and steep hills rendered the… Read more »

Topics: KCET

Incline L.A.: Angels Flight and Its Lost Sibling, Court Flight (Episode One)

Posted by Nathan Masters on May 30, 2013

Angels Flight: a downtown Los Angeles landmark. Its orange, beaux-arts archways and simple, Edwardian technology stand in contrast to the modern skyscrapers of the financial district. This cherished historical monument is a remnant of an earlier age. In the early decades of the twentieth century,… Read more »

Topics: KCET

KCET Video Series Debuts May 30

Posted by Nathan Masters on May 29, 2013

Photo of Angels Flight by William Reagh, courtesy of the Los Angeles Public Library Photo Collection.

On Thursday, May 30, a new web video series showcasing L.A. as Subject member collections and the archivists, librarians, and experts who care for them debuts on KCET.org.

Through photographs, maps, films, and other resources from L.A. as Subject member collections, Incline L.A. tells the story… Read more »

Topics: KCETLA as Subject

When Lincoln Park Was Eastlake

Posted by Nathan Masters on May 23, 2013

Courtesy of the Werner Von Boltenstern Postcard Collection, Department of Archives and Special Collections, Loyola Marymount University Library.

Like many of Los Angeles' first public parks, Eastlake (now Lincoln) Park began as unwanted land: a fifty-acre site rejected by a railroad and given to the city for free. But like its crosstown rival, Westlake (now MacArthur) Park, Eastlake soon grew into one of the city's most popular outdoor… Read more »

Topics: KCET

Arch and Castle Rocks: Lost Landmarks of Pacific Coast Highway

Posted by Nathan Masters on May 2, 2013

Surfers. Palatial estates. Soul-crushing traffic. Pacific Coast Highway treats motorists to many iconic Southern California views and experiences. But two distinctively shaped rocks have been missing from the Pacific Palisades shoreline for decades, victims of the scenic highway's development.

Read more »

Topics: KCET